Matthew Kadey, RD

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Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Black Bean Brownies

This gluten-free, dairy-free recipe might just be one of the highest-fiber, highest-protein brownies around. So rich-tasting and full of chocolate flavor, even kids won't have any idea what the secret ingredient is.

Gluten-Free Homemade Mustard

Enjoy this intensely flavored Gluten-Free Homemade Mustard on burgers, in vinaigrettes and potato salads. If you like your mustard fiery, use brown mustard seeds.

Beer-Brined Chicken with Orange-Scented Quinoa

Brining chicken breast keeps it deliciously moist during cooking while the beer infuses it with an interesting flavor. You can also use turkey breast with this Beer-Brined Chicken with Orange-Scented Quinoa recipe.

Gluten-Free Chocolate Beer Chili

Tap into the flavor-enhancing potential of gluten-free beer with this hardy Chocolate Beer Chili recipe. Very tasty!

Bottoms Up!

Brewers of gluten-free beer are often celiacs themselves, like Gonzalez, which adds a credibility factor with their customers. Others, like Russ Klisch, just want to help quench the thirst of the millions who can’t drink regular beer. Klisch is president and founder of Lakefront Brewery, a microbrewery in Milwaukee. About five years ago, he received a phone call from a fellow in Houston with celiac disease, asking if Lakefront could brew up a gluten-free beer.

Specialty Culinary Oils Add Antioxidants to Your Diet

Using culinary oils adds natural plant compounds (like antioxidants) and other health benefits to your diet. Nutritionists say that for optimal wellbeing these good-for-you oils (low in saturated fats) should make up between 20 to 35 percent of total daily calories. Healthy fats help your heart beat stronger, your immune system work better and your skin stay moist and dewy. Plus they can add not-so-subtle sophistication to your menu. Where to start? Here’s help deciphering what’s good in the growing selection of oil products. From allergy-friendly health perks to flavor nuance, these oils are our top picks.

Time for Tea

Move over coffee! This ancient beverage is steeped in health benefits. From Earl Grey to Japanese sencha, there's a movement brewing in the United States. Tea is hot - and getting hotter, spurred on by the growing availability of delightful varieties and by research confirming wide-ranging health benefits of sipping and cooking with tea.

Rice Is Nice

Rice, an ancient food staple for billions, is unquestionably the planet’s most important plant. Cheap, plentiful and satiating, Oryza sativa appears in a staggering assortment of shapes, sizes and eye-popping colors and continues to inspire some of the finest culinary creations around the world. In many cultures, this humble, gracefully curved grain symbolizes prosperity, beauty and fertility (hence the custom of tossing rice at newly wedded couples). The verb “to eat” is “to eat rice” in some Asian cultures. Save for Antarctica, rice grows on every continent in more than 100 countries. Today, the United States produces more rice than ever before, about 19 billion pounds to be precise, with California and Arkansas leading the way. Though other gluten-free grains, like in-vogue quinoa and amaranth, are getting to be the rage these days, rice remains a nutritious powerhouse for a number of reasons. Easy to digest, rice (especially whole-grain brown rice) has the highest content of B vitamins of any grain and provides a healthy dose of fiber, vitamin E, potassium, zinc, iron, complex carbohydrates and amino acids. Pair it with beans and you have a complete protein. In the United States where rice is not an everyday food for most, allergic reactions are less common.

Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Chicken Fried Rice

Cold cooked rice is the secret to delicious fried rice. Here’s a quick and flavorful way to use leftover rice. Pork loin, ham, tofu or shrimp, if tolerated, can be substituted for chicken.

Gluten-Free Turkey Noodle Soup

Why just drink tea when you can cook with it? Tea leaves, which are teeming with disease-fighting antioxidants, can be sprinkled into rubs, soups, stews and even desserts for wonderful flavor and an added health boost. The delicate nature of white tea stock allows the robust flavor of kale, lemongrass and sesame oil to shine in this gluten-free, dairy-free recipe for Turkey Noodle Soup.

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