Recipes

Gluten-Free Multigrain Waffles

This multi-grain recipe incorporates nutritious flours to create savory, nutty-tasting waffles without the nuts. Use these waffles to make mini pizzas, crostini bottoms and sandwiches of all kinds. The possibilities are endless.   More...

Gluten-Free Stuffing Rolls

Here's a way to serve both bread and stuffing, all rolled into one. This recipe makes a deliciously portable item for holiday buffet or potluck that also works beautifully for a formal sit-down meal.   More...

Gluten-Free Italian Flatbread

This flavorful flatbread is easy to make and works great for sandwiches. It's perfect for your child's lunch box. It can be made with dairy and egg replacements with delicious results.   More...

Gluten-Free Flour Tortillas

These pliable wraps are a real treat to eat and far easier to make than you might suspect. Use them to make fajitas, burritos or sandwich wraps. To ensure tortillas remain soft and pliable, don’t roll the dough too thin before cooking them.   More...

Gluten Free Corn Tortillas

The foundation for tacos, quesadillas, enchiladas and other Latin dishes, corn tortillas are simple to make at home. Once you’ve tried homemade, you won’t go back to store-bought. They require a tortilla press, available at Latino markets and online for under $25.   More...

Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Brown Bread

This simple allergy-friendly loaf makes an excellent sandwich bread but also stands alone as terrific toast. Gluten-free beer adds a deep flavor and helps it rise in the absence of yeast. This recipe is quick and easy and pairs well with most anything.   More...

Holiday Gingerbread

Subscribers Only — This rich, spicy gingerbread is delicious served warm with vanilla ice cream or nondairy whipped topping.   More...

Gluten-Free Sorghum Flatbread with Chana Masala

Subscribers Only — Chana masala, a deliciously spiced Indian dish featuring chickpeas, is the perfect accompaniment to these no-fuss, slightly sweet sorghum flatbreads. Flatbread and masala can be prepared ahead and reheated in the microwave. In fact, masala only gets better after a day or two in the fridge. This recipe can be made with egg replacement; see instructions below.   More...

Gluten-Free Master Dough

This gluten-free master dough recipe makes enough for two 12-inch pizzas, six pizza pockets or one large focaccia. I often use it to make one pizza and 3 pizza pockets. No need to let the dough rise; it puffs up nicely in the oven.   More...

Easy Gluten-Free Dinner Rolls

This simple dairy-free dinner rolls recipe can be mixed, baked and served in less than an hour. Our gluten-free dinner rolls are made with gluten-free All-Purpose Flour Blend.   More...

Gluten-Free Cranberry Mayo Bread

Bursting with flavor, this gluten-free cranberry mayo sandwich bread is slightly tangy and easy to make. Try it at breakfast or as an afternoon snack.   More...

Dosa: Savory Indian Gluten-Free Crepe

This savory Indian crepe is typically stuffed with a potato-and-onion filling and served with chutney, like Cilantro Chutney (below). Made with lentils and rice, dosa are a great source of protein and fiber. Traditional dosa are usually large (at least 12 inches) and cooked until crispy, requiring special pans and a fair amount of skill. This version is smaller and softer, yet sturdy enough to be stuffed with stir fry or scrambled eggs or used as a sandwich wrap. Easily reheated, it can accompany a meal as bread. Dosa can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator 3 to 4 days or frozen up to 6 weeks. The batter can be refrigerated up to 4 days before used.   More...

Savory Bread Cubes

Subscribers Only — Here’s a quick way to make gluten-free bread cubes for delicious holiday stuffing. Bake this gluten-free bread on a cookie sheet and it’s ready to cube. This recipe also makes Gluten-Free Savory Dinner Rolls.   More...

Injera: Easy-to-Eat Ethiopian Flatbread

This lightly sour, spongy flatbread is made with teff, a gluten-free grass native to Ethiopia. It’s the world’s smallest grain, about the size of a poppy seed, delivering an impressive amount of fiber, calcium, protein and iron. For injera, the teff batter is slightly fermented, making it easier to digest. (For mild flavor, soak it overnight. For more traditional sour taste, soak it up to 2 days.) Prepared injera can be frozen for future use. In traditional Ethiopian cuisine, injera is used as a utensil to scoop food and absorb its juices. It can accompany soup and stew or can be served with your favorite dip.   More...