Apr/May 2014

Features

Top 6 Supplements for Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

Gluten-free foods are often lacking in key nutrients, like iron, zinc, magnesium, phosphorous and B vitamins, because wheat is taken out of the diet and because many gluten-free foods are not fortified with vitamins and minerals, says Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN, nutrition coordinator of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and lead nutrition author for CeliacNow.org. A daily multivitamin/mineral supplement typically provides at least 100 percent of the recommended levels of these nutrients. “Your multivitamin/mineral supplement is a base-line protection for getting a lot of the key vitamins and trace minerals that are not present in your diet,” Dennis says.   More...

How to Prepare an Allergy-Friendly Easter Dinner

Subscribers Only — Easter dinner was the first occasion I shared with my husband’s family. His mother Greta was 90 at the time and wasn’t cooking anymore. She took nine of us to her favorite restaurant where I got to know the family while we ate. The next Easter, I cooked dinner for the family at Greta’s house. As everyone laughed and feasted around her large table, I felt like I was part of the clan. Greta is no longer with us but her generous table graces our home and my husband and I now host the family’s Easter dinner each year. This special, allergy friendly meal is a celebration that always features spring produce—asparagus, peas, baby carrots, young radishes and strawberries—served in new ways every Easter.   More...

Gluten and Your Brain

Subscribers Only — In 2008, Julie Hahn, then 51, dropped and broke every one of her coffee mugs in a matter of weeks. The Colorado Springs resident had not only become suddenly and inexplicably clumsy, she was also having trouble with her balance. It wasn’t long before Hahn’s gastroenterologist, Scot Lewey, DO, clinical professor of medicine at Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience, confirmed the celiac diagnosis. Hahn had celiac antibodies and her intestinal villi were flattened. Lewey also diagnosed gluten ataxia, a gluten-related autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the cerebellum, the balance and coordination center of the brain.   More...

Nutritional First Aid Kit: Gluten-Free Diet Supplements

Some supplements might only be necessary during periods of illness, stress or travel. Think about the following supplements as part of your nutritional first aid kit, says Christine Doherty, ND, medical director of Balance Point Natural Medicine in Milford, New Hampshire, and founder of GlutenFreeVitamins.com. Probiotics. Probiotics can help improve the health of your gut, Doherty says. “The key is there is no right formula for everybody. Unfortunately, the research is at the stage where we know probiotics are important but the only real tool we have for figuring out which ones are best is trial and error. When you find the ones that work, you will feel better and your gut will work better.”   More...

Nutrient Know-How: Supplementing a Gluten-Free Diet

Although there are no prescription drugs for celiac disease, people on a gluten-free diet may still need to pop some pills. Vitamin and mineral supplements can be crucial to ensuring good health. After years of undetected gut damage, it can take a long time for the body to heal. Supplements aid healing, providing missing nutrients that haven’t been properly absorbed and that aren’t present in many processed gluten-free foods. Supplements tend to be far-reaching in their effects and benefits, says Christine Doherty, ND, a naturopathic doctor who specializes in celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003, Doherty is the medical director of Balance Point Natural Medicine in Milford, New Hampshire, and the founder of GlutenFreeVitamins.com, where she formulates C-Liac Vitality supplements geared for those on a gluten-free diet.   More...

Problems with Pollen: Allergy Issues and Supplemental Help

In 2005, Marvin Boris, MD, a New York-based pediatric allergist, reported findings from a small study he conducted of this pollen phenomenon. He found that behavioral and neurological symptoms significantly increased when some children with autism or ADHD were exposed to pollen. He also reported that these children with regressive behaviors didn’t always have classic allergy symptoms, such as red and itchy eyes or a runny nose. Sometimes behavior and learning problems can be the only signs the child is reacting to pollen. In adults, behavioral and neurological symptoms can include spaciness, irritability and depression.   More...