Jun/Jul 2013

Features

Road Trip:
Vacations, Kids and Food Allergies

Every summer, my family vacations on Oak Island, North Carolina, where we soak up the sun and surf and make happy memories. My 10-year-old son has multiple allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, milk, egg, soy, sesame and mustard, along with asthma. So before we ever hop in the car, I pull out my "road map," a regimen I use for traveling with food allergies. I want our trip to be about having fun, not about our son getting an anaphylactic reaction or feeling deprived.   More...

Fight Back!

Subscribers Only — On a recent airplane flight, the gentleman sharing my armrest miscalculated his sneeze. He aimed into his bent elbow but sprayed my face instead. Fortunately, germ exposure when traveling isn’t usually this direct, but less obvious contact can still add up to health hazards. Changes in time zones, sleep patterns and diet, plus increased alcohol consumption common on vacations, can run down your immune system, making you more susceptible to illness.   More...

Hit the Trail

"Backpacking to me is setting aside the matters of the world and going where nobody else is, absorbing nature and appreciating why itfs there. It helps to bring clarity to my life and my relationships," says Munson, who runs the website GoneAlpine.com .   More...

The JOY of (Not) Cooking

Subscribers Only — No-cook cooking is the perfect answer to sizzling days or when a crazed work and family schedule means you want to eat without pulling out pots and pans. With a bit of creativity, you can turn out delicious gluten-free breakfast, lunch, dinner and desserts without turning on your oven or your stove. Follow these tips to glean the best flavor from your no-cook dishes.   More...

Sensitive to Sugar

Subscribers Only — Fructose is what’s called a simple sugar. Found naturally in many fruits, fructose is widely used as a sweetener (often as high fructose corn syrup) in foods ranging from catsup to bread. Normally, fructose is absorbed in the small intestine. But in people with FM, fructose passes directly into the large intestine, where bacteria ferment it, producing gases—hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane. Abdominal pain, bloating, gas, belching, diarrhea or constipation may result.   More...