June/July 2008

Features

Hidden Additives and Allergens in Beer and Wine

Though anaphylaxis is rare (alcohol accounts for only a small percentage of the United States' 150 annual food-related anaphylaxis fatalities), allergic reactions to wine and beer are relatively common. The causes of these reactions range from sulfites to sturgeon swim bladders. A single bottle of beer, for example, can contain more than ten allergens, including preservatives, histamines, animal products, pesticides, wheat, yeast and corn. Why are these allergens added and what symptoms do they cause?   More...

The Autism Puzzle - Understanding Autism Diagnosis

Goodbye Allergy Shots? If you’ve been wishing for an alternative to allergy shots to treat your child’s allergic asthma, researchers from the University of Genoa in Italy have good news. A review of nine studies that included more than 400 patients between the ages of 3 and 18 found that children with allergic asthma might benefit from oral administration in the form of tablets or drops. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was found in the researchers’ review to…   More...

Outward Bound - Traveling With Food Allergies

The thought of family travel can be daunting, especially if you plan to go overseas to remote and distant places. Add a child with severe food allergies to the mix and the idea gets downright overwhelming. When it comes to avoiding certain foods, many of the challenges are the same, regardless of whether your destination is Los Angeles or Laos.   More...

A Toast to Gluten-Free Libations

Subscribers Only — Gluten-sensitive people used to stick to hard ciders as the next best thing to beer. These days, however, new options abound. Many smaller breweries now produce gluten-free beers. Giants like Anheuser-Busch are also joining the fray. Brewer Kristin Zantop says the company’s Redbridge is a sorghum beer without added wheat or barley.   More...