April/May 2010

Features

A Closer Look at Gluten-Free Labeling

In late 2008, a newspaper investigation revealed that certain gluten-free products manufactured by Wellshire Farms and specifically marketed to children were mislabeled. As news spread about the faulty designation, parents of food allergic kids became furious¡ªand scared. At least two children with wheat allergies developed anaphylaxis to the mislabeled food and required hospitalization. In addition, countless children with celiac disease were sickened, including 2-year-old James Fourie.   More...

Eat Gluten-Free For Le$$

Does your special diet give you sticker shock? No wonder. Many products that are gluten free and allergy friendly are downright expensive. The tight economy has many of us tightening our belts and that makes stretching the grocery budget to accommodate special-diet items more daunting than ever. If you’re feeling the pinch, try these suggestions to get more nutritional bang for your buck.   More...

Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Subscribers Only — When I was growing up, candy never held any appeal for me. But shortly before my 16th birthday, I found myself devouring every candy bar in sight and nursing a cut that would not heal. I knew that something was wrong. My doctor told me that I had type 1 diabetes and that I would have to take three to five injections a day for the rest of my life. It was ominous news, but at 16, I was young and invincible. Within hours of diagnosis, I was learning to give myself insulin shots.   More...

Allergy-Free Summer Camp

Subscribers Only — Every year, approximately 11 million children and adults attend over 12,000 camps throughout the United States. Yet few of these camps, if any, specifically accommodate kids with food allergies and anaphylaxis. Camp is an enriching adventure that offers fun and friendships, an opportunity that every child—even those with food allergies and sensitivities—should have. The experience helps children become more independent and grow as individuals.   More...

FDA's Proposal

FDA published its proposed rule for defining gluten free in 2006. According to the proposal, a gluten-free label would mean a food does not contain:   More...

Report a Mislabel

If you think you’ve purchased a mislabeled product, you can report it to the appropriate government agency. Contact FDA’s district office consumer complaint coordinator in your region. Be prepared with the product UPC code. In addition, contact the product manufacturer. The customer service department may assist you.   More...

Quick and Easy Munching

Subscribers Only — Seeds and nuts (if tolerated) make a nutritious snack between meals. Keep fruit roll-ups (most are gluten free, check labels) and small boxes of raisins nearby, in case of hypoglycemia. Here are other suggestions for good-tasting munching.   More...